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LOCAL 

HISTORY 

373.1 

Iassemblei 

1955 



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Wormier Cou 



FISKE PUBL C LIBRARY 
3 5899 00086 7345 



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C^ditoriat and eJDedicat 



ion 

Philip Wood 

Again the time has come for another senior class to breathe one last breath 
within your walls, have one last laugh, and learn one last fact before it passes 
through your age-worn portals and out upon the sunlit paths which life has 
reserved for each of us. And yet we feel no fear, for you have groomed and 
prepared us as no other could to meet each challenge life may hurl at us. You 
have performed this thankless task for decades and now since you have outworn 
your purpose, your antiquated frame will soon be turned out to pasture to be 
replaced by a new gleaming structure. But though you may no longer exist as a 
material part of Wrentham you shall always linger in our memories. 

"So sleeps the pride of former days, 
So glory's thrill is o'er. 
And hearts, that once heat high for praise, 
Now feel that pulse no more!" 

T. MOORE 



^Jable of L^ontentd 



Editorial and Dedication 1 

The Assembler Staff 3 

Faculty 4 

American Legion Essay 5 

Baby Daze 6 

Class History 7 

Class Pictures 8 

Perfect Boy and Girl at W.H.S 14 

Class Prophecy 15 

Class Will 16 

Gifts to the Senior Class 17 

Senior Hit Parade 18 

Who's Who 19 

Junior Class 20 

Sophomore Class 21 

Freshman Class 22 

Athletic Association * 23 

Boys' Basketball 1954-55 24 

Girls' Basketball Team 25 

Cheerleaders 26 

Faculty Team 27 

The Choral Art Society 28 

School Band 29 

Newspaper Staff 30 

Public Speaking Contest 31 

Student Council 32 

Casting Team 33 

Junior High Cheerleaders 34 

Junior High Basketball Team 35 

Junior High School Descant Choir 36 

The United Nations in Wrentham 37 

Poems 38 

Alumni 39 

Composite 41 

Advertising 42 



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Wren th am, Massachusetts 
19 5 5 



Editor-in-Chief 
Philip Wood 

Art Editors 
Carol Harmon Gail Waterman 

Managing Editors 
Karen Fahlgren Janet Goodwin 

Literary Editors 
Mary Ann Duffy Joan Whyte 

Alumni Editors 
Shirley Prue Carl Schwalbe 

Music Editor 
Andrew Graham 

Sports Editors 

Carmen Fiumara Sally Weber 

Sandra Cooper 



Business Manager 
Carlin Nightingale 

Feature Editors 
Mary Sue Smith Jacqueline Ware 

Faculty Adviser 
Grace W. Capron 

Advertising Editors 
Diana Dery Shirley Giannetti 

Marijane Roche Edward Bodmer 
Barrie Farrar David Cox 

Christine Fitzgerald Philip Wood 
Gail Waterman Jacqueline Ware 
Carlin Nightingale Philip Picard 
Carmen Fiumara Sally Weber 

Andrew Graham 



First row: Mary Sue Smith, Diana Dory, Janet Goodwin, Carlin Nightingale, Philip Wood. 
Karen Fahlgren. Marijane Roehe. Christine Fitzgerald. Second row: Mrs. Capron, Carol Har- 
mon, Jacqueline Ware, Gail Waterman, Shirley Prue, Sandra Cooper, Joan Whyte, Shirley 
Giannetti, Mary Ann Duffy. Third row: Sally Weber, Carmen Fiumara. Carl Schwalbe, Barrie 
Farrar, Andrew Graham. Edward Bodmer, David Cox. 




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First row: Mrs. Magraw, Mrs. MacLeod, Mrs. Mula. Mrs. Capron, Mr. Swett, Mr. Delaney, 
Mrs. Viall, Mrs. Ryan, Mrs. Morton. Second WW: Mr. Lucas, Mr. Morgan. Mr. Rishton. Mr. 
Silva, Mr. Sullivan, Mr. Carr, Mr. Harpin, Mr. Aucoin, Mr. Gleekman, Mr. Gallipeau. 



Superintendent of Schools Mr. Frederick Delaney 

Principal Mr. Earle Swett 

English Mrs. Grace Capron 

Assistant Administrator Mr. Albert Aucoin 

French and English Mr. John Lucas 

English and Social Studies Mrs. Grace Ryan 

Social Studies and Guidance Mrs. Celia Viall 

Social Studies Mr. Francis Gallipeau 

Mathematics and General Science Mr. Edwin Carr. Jr. 

Science Mr. Wallace Gleekman 

Languages Mr. Raoul Harpin 

Physical Education, Girls Mrs. Carolyn MacLeod 

Physical Education, Boys Mr. Elmer Silva 

Mathematics and Physical Education Mr. Edward Morgan 

Commercial Mrs. Dorothy Magraw 

Art : Mrs. Alice M. Mula 

Manual Arts Mr. Gilbert Rishton 

Music Mr. Frederick Sullivan 

Domestic Science Mrs. Priscilla Morton 



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f-^romotion of J^eace Jhrouah the Vlnited I lalionS 

It's an old story — man's quest for peace. It is old because it has been age- 
long and unconquerable. It is a new story because it is happening today. And 
it is a story that will continue, because man was made for peace — not war. The 
very fact that this struggle for peace has survived countless failures and dis- 
appointments is eloquent of its epic constancy. 

Modern man, with his mind and expectation too much bound to the present 
and recent past, might gain hope and perspective by looking to the future. And 
man's future, today, is in the United Nations. 

Since its conception nine years ago, the United Nations has been the 
symbol for those purposes to which it has pledged collective effort: Peace, 
Security, Human Rights. Law, Freedom. These are simple words but they are 
all essential. Without one, the others would all fail. They mean civilization. 
Today, sixty nations and two thousand million people are committed to them. 

"The process of learning to live together without war in this torn and dis- 
tracted world of ours is going to be painful and a constant challenge for the rest of 
our lives. Yet we know what the choice is. Either we manage it, or we face 
disaster." These are the words of the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 
They say that the job is now, and will always be now. 

The job has just begun. 

Through many and varied specialized agencies the United Nations is seeking 
to bring a new meaning to life for millions of people all over the world. These 
specialized agencies seek to generally raise standards of living. By raising the 
standards of living of a country the inhabitants are also given a dignity and pride 
which helps them understand that no matter what the threat to their peace is. 
they will strive to eliminate that threat. In main cases this will take months — 
even years. But who will measure this time against a third world war? 

Today tolerance is a necessity. Sometimes it may come hard. The price 
may be high — in time and endurance — but so is the stake: survival. 

If this is a time of survival, this is also the time when man dared to think of 
the welfare of the human race as a practical objective. Nations and peoples 
lacking adequate scientific knowledge can learn from others who have the skills 
and are willing to share them. The United Nations, with its specialized agencies, 
has begun to put this idea to work. Its technical assistance program and the 
coordinated effort of its related agencies are the greatest organized sharing of 
skills ever attempted. They answer a challenge that will remain even when 
threats to peace have been removed. 

The United Nations cannot by itself enforce peace; it cannot impose agree- 
ment. But in an age of total war and new weapons, neither can any alliance. 
The United Nations has been created so people can live together. In its Charter, 
nations have the means to come to terms — with each other and with this new age. 

But the United Nations is only as strong as the will of its Member states to 
unite their efforts. And the Member states are only as strong as the will of then- 
people. And the people are you and I — everybodv. 

That is the meaning of United Nations Day. The United Nations is what 
we want and what we will make of it. 

It is only a beginning. 

"... It will be a constant challenge for the rest of our lives." 

Sally Weber, '55 

Winner of the American Legion Veteran's Day Essay Contest 



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CHAPTER ONE 

September 5. 1951. was almost as important as June 10, 1955. It was on this date that 
a group of twelve and thirteen-year-old students entered their first year of high school. We 
all remember our first homeroom teacher. Mr. Pagos did much to help us in those first ten 
months of our high school days. During the year our class president, Sally Weber, presided 
at our class meetings. At one of these meetings we voted to have a "Parents' Nite". This night 
proved to be a big success with both the students and their parents. It was during this night 
that some of the freshmen got their first tryout as amateur actors in a courtroom scene which 
was to prove helpful in their junior and senior year. Also adding to the merry-making of the eve- 
ning were a trio of boys, namely a Mr. Schwalbe, a Mr. Nightingale, and a Mr. Farrar, who 
dressed up in feminine garments and sang "On the Dummy Line". 

CHAPTER TWO 

In our sophomore year the entire school mourned over the retirement of our beloved 
science teacher, "Pop" Ewing. However, Mr. Svvett could not acclaim all the credit of being 
the only baldheaded member of the faculty because a new teacher by the name of Mr. Hayes 
took Pop's place. Many members of our class were in Mr. Hayes's biology and plane geometry 
classes. Mickie Roche was elected as our class president. During the year we held three dances 
and had several food sales. In March the "First Annual Prize Speaking Contest" was held. 
One of our classmates. Shirley Prue, took first prize away. Mrs. Parise. our class adviser, 
had quite a lot of trouble trying to keep us quiet and for some strange reason bestowed upon 
us the title of being the "noisiest class" in all her years of teaching. Do you suppose that's 
the reason why she was to leave US in another year? 

CHAPTER THREE 

Our junior year was much more quiet than our sophomore year. Miss Roche must have 
been very successful in her position as sophomore class president because she was chosen 
by the class to be president for another year. Our school is noted for its science teachers. 
Mr. Hayes resigned as the second baldheaded member of our faculty and Mr. Petit took his 
place. In our senior year we were to have two more science teachers, namely Mr. Pierce and 
Mr. Cleekman. At the beginning of the year Mr. Pagos also left us and Mr. Toner was our 
new coach. In the fall we held our first class play entitled "Meet Corlis Archer". During the 
year we held two successful dances and in the spring we held our "Junior Prom". Two boys 
were chosen from the class to go to Boys' State hut unfortunately the reservations wore not 
sent in early enough and the boys did not go. However, Shirley Prue did go to Girls' State 
and had a grand time there. 

CHAPTER FOUR 

At last came our senior year! This was the final step in our four years. We started the 
year off by holding the first dance. A month after that we held our second class play, entitled 
"A Case of Springtime". All who attended will remember scenes such as Philip Picard's putting 
on the hat with an egg in it; Carmen Fiumara's singing "There Will Be a Hot Time in the 
Old Town Tonight"; and Shirley Pine's sitting on a pincushion in the chair. In the fall our 
school was most honored indeed to be a part of the U. N. Fair in Wrentham. As part of an 
English assignment we were asked to write essays on the U. Nf. Sally Weber's essay won 
first prize and she spent three days in New York with the other winners. Philip Wood wrote 
a vivid description of the entire t T . N. program in Wrentham and his article was printed in 
the Massachusetts Tcaclier magazine. The senior class has certainly done its part in helping 
in the Athletic Association and the Student Council. Carl Schwalbe is president of the 
Athletic Association and Philip Wood, David Cox. Mickie Roche, and Carol Harmon are 
officers of the Student Council. Our class has also taken part in the basketball spirit of the 
school. Barrie Farrar is captain of the Boys' Varsity Team, Carmen Fiumara and Philip Wood 
are managers of the two varsities, and Mickie Roche is the head-cheerleader. During the 
year our class put on two Saturday night suppers. In March the "Third Annual Prize Speak- 
ing Contest" was held. Seniors participating in the contest were Shirley Prue, Philin Wood, 
and David Cox. In the spring we held a record hop with Ernie Anderson as disk jockey. 
Everyone enjoyed himself at the dance even if Ernie showed up an hour late and the seniors 
went twenty dollars in the hole. Jacqueline Ware was chosen to represent us at the Daughters 
of American Revolution convention, and Philip Wood was chosen as good government rep- 
resentative at the State House. Karen Fahlgren and David Cox were chosen as exchange 
students and were the guests of Quincy High School. In February we started to put together 
our year-book. It is interesting to note that the Senior Class of '55 received more advertise- 
ments than any previous class. During the April vacation we spent fixe glorious days doing 
the town in New York. The pleasant memories of our grand days in good, old Wrentham 
High School were in the minds of all as we stepped forxvard to receive our diplomas on that 
warm June night. I would even dare sax- that there was a tear of joy in Mrs. Capron's eye as 
she received the satisfaction of completing another class through their high school days. 

June 10. 1966 



« 7 




C^dward ~~). d5odtner, Ar. 

"Ed" 

U. S. Navy 

Prom Committee '54; Property Committee Junior Play '54; 
Advertising Editor — Assembler Staff '55. 

"A sober face must mean he's thinkiri 
For Ed's style is talking, joking, and winkin." 



~J)andra Aean K^ooper 



"Sandy" 

St. Mary's Hospital 

Chorus '52. '53, '55; Volleyball '53; Captain. Basketball '53: 
Usher for Class Play '55; Sports Editor — Assembler '55. 

"Lots of intelligence, lots of fun. 
She's well-liked by everyone." 




aUavid C^vani L^ox 



"Dave" "Coxie" 

Rifle Club '52; Class Play '54, '55; Basketball '54; Prize 
Speaking '54. '55; Student Council. Vice-President '55; 
Prom Committee 54; Student Press Correspondent '55; 
Chorus '54, '55; Boys' State '54; Advertising for Assembler 
•55; Student Government Exchange '55. 

"Distinguished-looking with lots of brains 
Although he's smart, his friendship reigns." 



oDiana ~jr. aD 



erij 

"Dixa" 

Chorus '53, '54, '55; Archbearer '53, '54; Usher for Class 
Play '54. '55; Volleyball '53; Prom Committee '54; Advertis- 
ing — Assembler Staff '55. 

"Short and sweet 
With a smile so gay 
That none can compete 
With her u inning nay." 



« 8 » 






fl'/aru ^rnn oDufj-u 



Boston University 

Basketball '53; Spotlight Reporter '54; Class Play Usher '54, 
•55; Archbearer '54; Prom Committee '54; Assistant-Editor 
Toiler '55; Literary Editor Assembler '55. 

"Her poetic mind neglects not a soul 
Her writings all prove her ability 
To be a poet may not be her goal 
But creativeness is an extra facility." 




^J\aren Elizabeth ^J~ahlaren 

Colby Junior College 

Basketball '52. '53, '54, '55 Student Council '53; Archbearer 
•54; Winter Carnival Committee '53, '54; Class Play 54, '55; 
Choral Art Society '53, '55; Volley Hall '53, '54; Prom Com- 
mittee '54; Managing Editor Assembler 55. 

"Sophistication can mix with fun 
And really cause a riot. 
For when something daring is to be done 
She's always first to try it.'' 




& 



a trie ^srarrar 



Basketball '52, '53, '54, '55; Baseball '52, '54; Athletic 
Association-Representative '54; Athletic Association Vice- 
President, 55; Winter Carnival Attendant '54; Assembler '55. 

"However serious things may be 
Its all a joke to him. 
He never worries needlessly; 
He always wears a grin." 



O h ris tin e *j~ilza era id 

"Chris" 

Cambridge School of Business 

Dance Committee '53, Walpole; Junior Prom Committee '54, 
Walpole; Assembler Staff '55. 

"Her innocent features are a blend 
Of qualities that make up a friend. 






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« 9 » 



c 



armen ^riumara 



Boston University 

Basketball '53, '54; Winter Carnival Committee '53; Choral 
Art Society '54, '55; Prom Committee '54; Boys' State '54; 
Class Play '55; Basketball Manager '55; Newspaper Staff '55; 
Sport Beporter Assembler Staff '55. 

"Be it good or be it bad, 
We'll be sure to see this hid 
As a student of complicity 
At Boston University." 




S^hirleu If I. KJiannetti 



Basketball '52, '53, Captain '54, '55; Archbearer '52; 
Choral Art Society '53, '55; Usher for Play '54, '55; Volley- 
ball '53, '54; Prom Committee '54; Advertising Assembler 
Staff '55. 

"To be serious is murder to this lass; 
She can find a joke in any class." 



Aa.net Cy. Lfoodu/in 



Basketball '52; Choral Art Society '53; Band '53, '54, '55; 
Prom Committee '54; Class Play '54, '55; Newspaper Staff 
.55; Managing Editor, Assembler '55. 

"To make her way she studies much 
On science, math. English, and such." 



^J4. -Stndrew Ljraham 

"Andy" 

Fryberg Academy 

Winter Carnival .53; Choral Art Society '53, '54, '55; Class 
Play '54, '55; Basketball '52; Junior Prom Committee '54: 
Editor of Beehive '54; Editor of Tatler '55; National Poetry- 
Association '53, '54; Band '55; Assembler Staff '55. 

"Poetic, dramatic, and artistic — 
He tries to make life worth living. 
His poems arc never sadistic; 
His philosophy he always is giving." 



10 » 



K^arol sQnn ^rri 



arm on 



Katharine Gibbs School 

Archbearer '52; Volleyball '53; Softball '53; Basketball '53; 
Usher Junior Class Play '54; Prom Committee '54; Senior 
Class Play '55; Treasurer of Student Council '55; Business 
Editor of the Toiler '55; Choral Arts Society '55; Art Edi- 
tor — Assembler '55. 

"It's nice to be natural. 
If you're naturally nice; 
Under both of these terms 
This girl will suffice." 



L^arlin .3. / liahtinaale 

"Chickie" 

Air Cadets 

Basketball '52. '53, '54; Baseball '52. '53; Rifle Club '52 
Winter Carnival Committee '53; Choral Art Society '53, '54 
Prom Committee '54; Student Government Committee '54 
Class Play '54, '55; Athletic Association-Representative '55 
Business Manager — Assembler '55. 

"He walks slow, but thinks ijuick; 
We all go for dear old Chick." 





/' hit in A. J-^icard 



"Pic' 



'Phil" 



Winter Carnival Committee '53; Prom Committee '54; 
Choral Arts Society '55; Senior Play '55; Advertisements for 
Assembler '55. 

"Trouble, trouble everywhere 
And not a soul in the ))ark; 
But along comes Phil so unaware 
And trouble has found its mark." 




SLl 



t Frances J rue 



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Boston University 

Basketball '53, '54; Choral Art Society '53, '54. '55; Prize 
Speaking '53, '54, '55; Treasurer '54, '55; Spotlighter for 
Traveler '54; Class Play '54 '55; Girls' State '54; Prom Com- 
mittee '54; Queen of Winter Carnival '54; Business Editor 
of Tatler '55; Alumni Editor of Assembler '55. 

"She's always worried about a test 
Yet her marks come out the best." 




X 



« 1 1 » 




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/aruane 

MlCKIE 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital (S. of N. ) 

Basketball '52, '53, '54, '55; Arehbearer '52; Class President 
'53, '54; Cheerleader '53, '54, '55; Temporary Student Coun- 
cil '53; Secretary of Student Council '53, '55; Attendant to 
Queen Winter Carnival Ball '53; Softball '53; Volleyball '53, 
'54; Athletic Association '53, '54, '55; Class Play '54, '55; 
Prom Committee '54; Advertising — Assembler Staff '55. 

"Whenever she's happy, she's very giddy; 
But when she's mad, she's very pretty. 
Then there are times when she's flirtatious; 
But in any mood she's always gracious. 



y^arl S^chwalbt 



"Squeaky" 

Basketball '52, '53; Baseball '52; Student Council '54; Ath- 
letic Association President '55; Class Treasurer '52, '53; Class 
Vice-President '54; Class President '55; Choral Arts '54, '55; 
Staff '55; Rifle Club '52; Prom Committee '54; Play Com- 
mittee '54, '55; King, Winter Carnival '54. 

"He sits in the corner so meek and shy 
Like a new born baby calf. 
But come out with a joke and he's the guy 
Who's always the first to laugh." 



1 1 lit rii ^ue J^mith 



"!/ 



Sue 



Mount Ida 

Volleyball '52, '53, '54; Basketball '53; Arehbearer '53, '54; 
Usher for Christmas Concert '53; Play '54, '55; Prom Com- 
mittee '54; Student Council '55; Newspaper Staff '55; Feature 
Editor of Assembler '55; Choral Arts Society '55. 

"Timid and shy she appears, 
But is bubbling with fun down deep; 
For when real hep music she hears. 
It's hard for her to sleep." 



are 



/Jacqueline ^rrancei lA/i 

"Jackie" "Jac" 

Northeastern University 

Winter Carnival Committee '53; Class Secretary '53, *54; 
Volleyball '52, '54; Basketball '53, '54; Cheerleading '53, '54, 
'55; Choral Art Society '53, '54, '55; Prom Committee '54; 
Usherette '53; Arehbearer '54; Student Council Representa- 
tive '54, '55; Class Play '54, '55; Class Newspaper '55; Fea- 
ture Editor — Assembler '55; Secretary, Athletic Association 
'55; Representative D.A.R. '55. 

"Honest, faithful, patient, sincere, 
Anything but fraud. 

These are the things which she holds dear 
And for which shell receive her reward." 



12 » 



Qall Wat. 



ertnan 

"Stevie" 

Basketball '52. '53, '55; Archbearer '52; Play '54, '55; Min- 
strel Show '55; Assembelr Staff '55; Chorus '53, '54, '55; Soft- 
hall '53; Winter Carnival Committee '53; Editor of Taller 
'55; Prom Committee '54. 

"Stevie" she is to a few; 
"Gail" to all the rest. 
No matter what she tries to do 
She always does her best. 



Salty Wei, 



er 



Colby College 

Class President '52; Basketball '52. '53, '54, '55; Student 
Council Bepresentative '53; Choral Art Society '53, '54, '55; 

Student Government Committee "54; Prom Committee '54; 
Class Play '54, '55; Sports Editor — Assembler '55. 

"Her intelligence sometimes reveals 
Exaelhj the way she feels; 
But her happy laugh discloses 
A life filled with sunshine and roses." 



Aoan _y^r. lAJItult 



xyle 

"Jo.M " 

Wilfred Academy 

Archbearer '53 ,'54; Basketball '53, '54; Prom Committee 
'54; Usher for Class Plays '54, '55; Newspaper Staff '55; 
Literals Editor for Assembler '55. 

"Her intelligent looks conceal Iter personality 
For she's full of jokes, fun. and rascality." 



Pkdip Jl. Wood 



"Phil" 



'Woody' 



Class Seeretary '52, '55; Bifle Club '52; Basketball '52, '53. 
Manager '55; Temporary Student Couneil '53, Student Coun- 
cil Viee-President '54, President '55; Baseball '52, '53; Class 
Play '54, '55; Boys' State '54; Prom Committee '54; Choral 
Art Society '54, '55; Student Government Committee '55; 
Editor-in-chief of Assembler '55. 

"At times he makes us very mad. 
At times he's goody-goody. 
But think of all the fun we've had. 
With our everloving Woody." 





« 13 » 



/-^erfect W*'*' and d->ou of UU.^rr.^!>. 



GIRLS 

Lips Sandra Cooper 

Voice Diana Dery 

Hands Mary Ann Duffy 

Hair Karen Fahlgren 

Waist Christine Fitzgerald 

Eyes Shirley Giannetti 

Complexion Janet Goodwin 

iVo.se Carol Harmon 

Eye Lashes Shirley Prue 

Personality Marijane Roche 

St)iile Mary Sue Smith 

Figure Jacqueline Ware 

Teeth Gail Waterman 

Height Sally Weber 

Legs Joan Whyte 



BOYS 

Personality Edward Bodmer 

Hair Dave Cox 

Physique Barrie Farrar 

Voice Carmen Fiumara 

Smile Carlin Nightingale 

Eyes Philip Picard 

Laugh Carl Schwalbe 

Teeth Philip Wood 

Height Andrew Graham 

Complexion Jack Haehnel 



« H » 



C-taJd f ropnecu 



June 10, 1966 

Miss Mary Sue Smith 

Gallup Research Poll Industry 

New York, New York 

Dear Mary Sue, 

I have been commissioned by the Mid-Western United Insurance Firm to give a dis- 
sertation on world problems and the way they effect the physiological needs of the people 
since 1955 until the present day. I was extremely surprised to learn that you are the secretary 
to the manager or the Research Poll office located in New York. I am research analyst for 
the western branch of the Gallup Polls and am awaiting a new foreign assignment in the 
process. 1 imagine we will be working together on this matter. 

The other day I happened to run into an old classmate of ours, Philip Picard, and I 
mean "ran" into him. Being the type of fellow he is, he excused my carelessness, and we 
began to discuss the success of classmates over locked bumpers and crashed fenders. Phil is 
the owner of a fleet of Cadillacs, Buicks, and Fords, and runs his own Drive-U-School in 
Longbeach, California. Just at that moment a police car pulled up to a screeching halt 
and California's version of Rudolph King got out to give me a ticket. However, when Carl 
Schwalbe realized that I was a former classmate of his, he discovered he had forgotten 
his tickets and after a few words he left. 

It seems that Karen Falhgren, head buyer for Saks Fifth Avenue, just returned from 
her latest Paris buying trip with the newest Parisian and Italian creations. While in Paris, 
Karen visited Carol Harmon, who, as you no doubt know, married her boss while working 
as a secretary to the United Nations and is residing in Paris. 

I read in the newspaper that Janet Goodwin, literary critic for the New York Times, 
has awarded the Book-of-the-Month medal to Andrew Graham for his novel "The Individual- 
ist". Andy is now a rising novelist and renowned psychologist and adds this award to a 
host of others. Janet has just refused an otter to work for one of the Paris newspapers, to 
remain with the New York Times. 

Doctor Philip Wood has been named the Doctor of the Year for his valuable service 
to the government in his research in the field of incurable diseases. Sandra Cooper has 
also been assigned by the government to continue work in this field by being appointed 
Director of Medical Technologists at the Medical Base Center at Washington, D. C. It is 
interesting to note that Sandy is working in the new, ingeniously constructed research build- 
ing designed and constructed under the direction of David E. Gox. 

Another one of our classmates is residing in Washington. Edward Bodmer, the designer 
i)f the fifteen dollar bill, has been commissioned to design the new postage stamp series. 

The former Marijane Roche and her doctor-pilot husband have devoted their lives to 
serve the sick of the Alaskan wastelands. Marijane is a member of the Alaskan Community 
and Visiting Nurse Corps of which she is an associate founder. 

It seems that classmates of ours have been attracted by the lure of foreign countries. Sally 
Weber, the former Vienna correspondent and linguist, has been awarded the 1965 Pulitzer 
Prize for exceptional work in foreign coverage. Sally's husband is preparing her story as a 
basis of a "Big Story" tele-cast. 

Dean Jacqueline Ware has been recalled from Germany where she has been an exchange 
Dean to an exclusive Girl's School to become Director of Education for the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. Before returning to this country, Jackie is flying to Rome to visit Shirley 
Giannetti who has been transferred from the Chicago Airline Office to Rome where she is 
serving as a secretary. 

Joan Whyte is now the chief hair stylist for the John Power's Modeling Agency and is 
preparing to accompany her husband on a nation-wide lecture tour to various beauty culture 
schools. Joan was visited by Shirley Prue. Shirley recently completed her Australian guest tour 
with Spitalny's All Girl Orchestra. Even with her heavy touring schedule, Shirley and her 
agent husband and three young sons, still find time to visit old friends in all the major cities 
of the world. 

Carmen Fiumara has sent to press a sequel to his last book of limericks which swept 
the nation. His latest book has been illustrated by himself. Carmen is a cartoonist for one 
of the leading newspaper syndicates when he is not writing. Nothing much is heard from 
Barrie Farrar. He is too busy counting the millions he is making on his latest oil discovery 
in Oklahoma. He did take time out to spend a few minutes with Carlin Nightingale when 
Chickie passed through on his way to Mexico where he has been sent by the American 
Exporting Firm, because of his adeptness at Spanish and his selling ability, to set up a 
branch office. Chickie met Jack Haehnel on his way. Jack has designed a new, faster, more 
economical sports car and was on his way to the testing grounds for a trial run. 

Lt. Christine Fitzgerald, after five years in the Waves, married a Vice-Admiral and has 
set up housekeeping in a unique home, a reconditioned submarine. Diana Dery, who married 
her childhood sweetheart just after graduation, is traveling in the Pacific area with her hus- 
band and their six children. Diana is returning shortly to her new home in Iowa. Gail Water- 
man has been promoted to Superintendent of Nurses at the Oregon Air Force Base. Gail 
is giving up her career shortly to spend full time as the new bride of an Air Force pilot. 

I must close now but will most likely see you when I arrive in New York. 

Sincerely yours, 

Mary Ann Duffy 
Attorney-at-Laiv 

« 15 » 



CU Witt 



Edward Bodmer leaves his car in the junk yard. 

David Cox leaves Betsy in Walpole. 

Sandra Cooper leaves Spanish. 

Diane Dery leases Mr. Carr with a quiet study. 

Mary Ann Duffy leaves algebra. 

Karen Fahlgren leaves her blond tresses to any weary Juniors who have 
found that Tintair isn't always right. 

Barrie Farrar leaves in a cloud of dust as the "little black Buick" skips 
merrily down the road. 

Christine Fitzgerald leaves as quietly as she entered. 

Carmen Fiumara leaves dirty basketballs to Vernon Nelson. 

Shirley Giannetti leaves the basketball team without a forward. 

Janet Goodwin leases Mr. Lucas a set of bookmarks. 

Andrew Graham leaves gladly. 

Jack Haehnel leaves his crutches and cane to a toothpick manufacturer. 

Carol Harmon leaves Walter behind. 

Carlin Nightingale leaves his speeding tickets to Walter Pierce. 

Philip Picard leases the Sophomore girls to the future Junior boys. 

Shirley Prue leaves her piano playing ability to Elin Youngdahl. 

Marijane Boche leaves her cheering ability to Patty Quinn. 

Carl Schwalbe graciously and willingly leases all his textbooks. 

Mary Sue Smith leaves her quiet refined manner to Gail Mather. 

Jacqueline Ware leaves her shorthand ability to Mr. Gregg. 

Gail Waterman leas es her gift for gab to some quiet soul. 

Sails - Weber leaves her height to Tom Thumb. 

Joan Whyte leaves "Problems", (a lot) 

Philip Wood leases Mrs. Viall's Problem's information uncontested. 



, 16 * 



To Edward Bodmer — a driver's license with a life-time guarantee. 

To David Cox — a new blue uniform. 

To Sandra Cooper — a Spanish answer book. 

To Diana Dery — a year's supply of air mail stamps. 

To Mary Ann Duffv — a new set of law books. 

To Karen Fahlgren — a bottle of white shoe polish for her bucks. 

To Barrie Farrar — a new push button for his car window. 

To Christine Fitzgerald — a microphone. 

To Carmen Fiumara — a set of dumbbells. 

To Shirley Giannetti — a key to Eddie Fisher's dressing room. 

To Janet Goodwin — an Encyclopedia Americana. 

To Andrew Graham — a filing cabinet for his future literary works. 

To Jack Haehnel — a new Harley-Davidson. 

To Carol Harmon — a passport to England. 

To Carlin Nightingale — a promotion to vice-president in charge of packing 

bologna at the A & P. 

To Philip Picard — a new ignition for his car. 

To Shirley Prue — a new baby grand piano. 

To Marijane Roche — a nurse's uniform in place of her cheering uniform. 

To Carl Schwalbe — an alarm clock to get him up in the morning. 

To Mary Sue Smith — a special driver's license from Montgomery Ward. 

To Jacqueline Ware — a book on how to analyze peculiar dreams. 

To Gail Waterman — a crystal ball to assure her of her future. 

To Sally Weber — a private excursion line between Nantucket and Wrentham. 

To Joan Whyte — a gold mine. 

To Philip Wood — anything from a Stanley Steamer on up. 



« 17 » 



Senior ^rrlt f^aradi 



e 



Edward Bodmer "Come On Out, I Know You're In There, Edward" 

David Cox "Davie Crocket" 

Sandra Cooper "Manhattan" 

Diana Dery "Marine Hymn" 

Mary Ann Duffy "Heart Of A Clown' 

Karen Fahlgren "Serenade" 

Barrie Farrar "I'll Be Around" 

Christine Fitzgerald "Melody of Love" 

Carmen Fiumara "I Got Rhythm" 

Shirley Giannetti "Them There Eyes" 

Janet Goodwin "Younger Than Springtime" 

Andrew Graham "You'll Never Walk Alone" 

Carol Harmon "Open The Door, Richard" 

Carlin Nightingale "Tell Your Tale, Nightingale" 

Philip Picard "Crazy Auto" 

Shirley Prue "Kitten On The Keys" 

Marijane Roche "Sincerely" 

Carl Schwalbe "Diane" 

Man- Sne Smith "Smile" 

Jacqueline Ware "Unchained?' 

Gail Waterman "Crystal Ball" 

Sally Weber "Rhapsody In Blue" 

Joan Whyte "Dance With Me, Henry" 

Philip Wood "You're Driving Me Crazy" 



« 18 » 



WL\ WL 



P. Wood 

C. Schwalbe 

D. Cox 

B. Farrar 
P. Picard 

C. Fiumara 

C. Fiumara 

D. Cox 
P. Picard 
P. Wood 

C. Fiumara 

E. Bodmer 

D. Cox 

B. Farrar 

C. Nightingale 
A. Graham 

C. Schwalbe 

D. Cox 
P. Wood 
P. Wood 
P. Picard 
C. Fiumara 

C. Fiumara 

A. Graham 

D. Cox 
P. Wood 
P. Picard 

D. Cox 

E. Bodmer 

B. Farrar 
P. Wood 

J. Haehnel 

B. Farrar 

C. Nightingale 
J. Haehnel 

C. Fiumara 
C. Schwalbe 
B. Farrar 

B. Farrar 

C. Fiumara 
P. Wood 
A. Graham 



Personality 

Flirt 

Determined 

Athletic 

Jolliest 

Artist 

Original 

Studious 

Generous 

Did Most For Class 

Talkative 

Friendliest 

Shy 

Noisiest 

Class Bluff 

Quarrelsome 

Popular 

Innocent 

Likely to Succeed 

Best Dressed 

Best Natured 

Best Dancer 

Shortest 

Tallest 

Mysterious 

Sophisticated 

Cutest 

Serious 

Sociable 

Wittiest 

Neatest 

Best Sport 

C lass S w eethea rts 

Actor - Actress 

Best Pal 

Musical 

Class Clown 

Best Looking 

Play Boy - Pin-Up Girl 

Class Babies 

Best All Around 

Corniest 



J. Ware 
C. Harmon 
S. Prue 
M. Boche 
M. S. Smith 

C. Harmon 
M. A. Duffy 
S. Prue 

M. A. Duffy 
M. Boche 
G. Waterman 
M. S. Smith 
S. Cooper 
S. Giannetti 

D. Dery 

M. A. Duffy 
J. Ware 
S. Weber 
S. Prue 
S. Weber 
S. Cooper 
D. Dery 
D. Dery 
K. Fahlgren 
C. Fitzgerald 
K. Fahlgren 
M. S. Smith 
C. Fitzgerald 
J. Goodwin 
J. Whyte 
S. Weber 
M. Boche 
J. Ware 
M. Boche 
S. Giannetti 
S. Prue 
J. Whyte 
J. Whyte 
J. Whyte 
J. Goodwin 
J. Ware 
G. Waterman 



« 19 




Back row: Patricia Quinn, Erdean Parmenter, Peter Martin, David Hebblethwaite, Raymond 
Harper, Parker Willard, James Bowers, Anita Clark. Middle row: Mrs. Celia Viall, Phyllis 
Manchester, Martha Bennett, Betty Spragne, July Gilmer, Betty Cox, Gloria Woodhams, 
Delight Harmon, Sarah Stabenfeldt, Joanne Lnkow. First row: Gail Gardner, Lynne Ross, 
Elin Youngdahl, George Willard, Patricia Quinn, Loretta Ross, Johanna Macaione, Patricia 
Gross, Joanne Slater, Barbara Copeland. 



President GEORGE WILLARD 

Vice-President PATRICIA QUINN 

Treasurer JOHANNA MACAIONE 

Secretary LORETTA ROSS 

The Junior Class started off their season of activities with the dance. 
"Witch Hop." On December 3 they presented the WARA Disc Jockey, Hal 
Peterson, at their dance called "The Hal Peterson Record Hop." This dance was 
followed by a successful food sale on January 29, 1955. On April 1 "Junior 
Prom," a farce-comedy, was presented at the Vogel School. Future plans 
include a dance on May 6 and the annual Junior Prom scheduled for June 3. 
The class wishes to thank all those who helped make their year's activities a 
success. 



Aunior i^-Cadd 



« 20 » 



Sophomore \^ici55 



At the beginning of the school year the class met and elected the following 
officers : 

President MICHAEL RISHTON 

Vice-President PETER MORSE 

Secretary JANET FARRAR 

Treasurer WILLIAM McGILL 

The Sophomore Class has had three successful dances. The first dance, 
"Harvest Moon," was held at the Vogel School, October 22, 1954. "Indian Sum- 
mer," the second dance, was held on November 12, 1954, at the Vogel School. 
The third dance. "March Breezes," was held on March 12, 1955, at the Vogel 
School. There is one more dance on our schedule. Although it is on Friday, 
May 13, we hope it will not be a bad luck dance. 



First row: Eileen Poland, Dianne DaVia, Shirley Kissell, Helen Larsen, Michael Rishton, Janet 
Farrar, Peter Morse. William McGill, Brooke Bullock, Elberta Reed, Beverly Manchester, 
Emily Meservie. Second row: Mr. Carr, Robert Prue, Robert Rogers, James Robson, Imre 
dejony, Anthony Maeaione, Colin MacLeod, David Picard, Anita Dexter, Lois Watson, 
Sandra Jenkins. Mrs. Magraw. Third row: Walter Swan, Walter Pierce, Richard Mitchell, 
David Cooper, Rudolph Saks, Vernon Nelson, Larrj Stringer, William Binney, Lee Thompson, 
James Burns, Mareia Salemme. 




« 21 




First WW, left to right: Anne Fiumara, Lorraine Haire, Kathleen McMahon, Rosemarie 
Coutn, Edwin Larsen, Ruth Blank, Roland Ferland, David Binney, Jessie Williams, Maureen 
Paksarian, Kenneth Jenkins, John McAfee. Second row: Mr. Elmer Silva. Ellen Sprague, 
Judy Dumont, Joan Richards, Jean O'Dea, Gail Mather. Frances Schurman, Janet Hall. Judy 
Harper, Lois Cook, William Burke, Marie McMahon, Betty Lukovv. Third row: Paul Martin, 
Philip Bettencourt, David Burns, Walter Kady, Gerald Gay, Robert Brothers, Paul Schwalbe, 
Paul Johnson. William Randall, Richard White, Roy Heinz. 



President DAVID BINNEY 

Vice-President ROLAND FERLAND 

Secretary RUTH BLANK 

Treasurer EDWIN LARSEN 

The Freshmen Class has held one dance this year, "Beginner's Luck." The 
dance was fairly successful. A second dance was held on April 15. 



^rres limen (_^ tc 



ci56 



« 22 » 



^rtlilelic -Arssociati 



OFFICERS 

President CARL SCHWALBE 

Vice-President BARRIE FARRAR 

Treasurer PATRICIA QUINN 

Secretary JACQUELINE WARE 



J lie eJLife \yjr ^r f Hanaaer 

Carmen Fiumara 

A manager's life is not much fun; 

He gets "digs'" and jeers from everyone. 

He carries the balls when we go on a trip 

And the score books and the medicine grip. 

He runs for the keys to open the door; 

He cleans up the balls, sweeps up the floors. 

He brings the boys oranges when they're dry 

And then gets the peels back right in the eye. 

He keeps the score, and if he's mistaken, 

They jump down his throat til his neck they are breakin' 

Though ac times he gets treated like a slob, 

I like it, cause that's my job. 



First row: Patricia Stahl, Barrio Farrar, Patricia Quinn, Jacqueline Ware, Carl Schwalbe, 
Jean Floyd. Back row: Cynthia Weber, Anthony Macaione, George Beard, Carlin Night- 
ingale, Joseph Cheney. Marijane Roche. Mr. Aucoin, Faculty Manager. 




« 23 » 




Back row, left to right: Mr. Silva, Paul Schwalbe, Walter Kady, David Burns, Anthony 
Macaione, William Binney, Gerald Gay, Barrie Farrar, Captain, Michael Rishton, Roland 
Ferland, Colin MacLeod, William Burke. Front row: Managers Philip Wood and Paul 
Johnson, Vernon Nelson, Carmen Fiumara. (Absent: George Richards, William Lowe, 
William Mulcahey). 

VARSITY 



Same Points 

Jim Bowers 172 

Barrie Farrar 165 

Bill Binnev 144 

Gerald Gay 138 



Name Points 

David Cooper 105 

Anthony Macaione 103 

George Richards 87 

David Binnev 41 



Practice began early this year under the direction of our new coach, Mr. Silva, whom 
the boys welcomed heartily. October and November were slow months as far as practice 
was concerned, but when December rolled around we had something tangible with which 
to work. 

This year we had the distinction of being in the Mayflower League, which set us up 
against some tough opposition. We played three non-league games which greatly aided us 
in discovering our weaknesses. 

The first league game was against Dover at which the boys went down fighting. The 
games seemed to go by swiftly with Wrentham not breaking any records. A new offense was 
worked on and we defeated Norton. Once again the games rolled by with Wrentham still not 
showing much promise of leadership, although our boys were playing their hearts out. It 
seemed that the toughest teams were the teams that they played hardest against and that they 
laid down against the teams they were capable of beating. One of the big factors governing 
our wins and losses was that many of the players were ill at the most crucial games. How- 
ever, we defeated Norton again. 

The boys had something extra to work for this year since they were to play Hanover, a 
team which they could beat, at a tournament. The game was a tough one but we missed 
again. 

Coach Silva feels that next year we shall have a good team, since we are losing only one 
varsity player. This year our team was young and inexperienced but with this year's experi- 
ence behind them, they should have a good season next year. We graduating seniors wish 
them the best of luck. 



Boy* ' (Basketball 1954-55 

Sponsored by HARRY R. SHEPHERD 



« 24 » 



Qirt& ' Ba&htUtl 1954-55 



SCHEDULE AND RESULTS 

VARSITY \Y. O. JUNIOR VARSITY W. O. 

Plainville °33 13 36 11 

Medway 21 29 13 27 

Dover 22 33 *36 19 

Miliis 44 45 °23 7 

Foxboro 26 28 *14 10 

Medfield °40 24 15 19 

Foxboro 30 33 "25 24 

Miliis 25 25 10 14 

Plainville °39 19 °25 4 

"Games won 

Under the leadership of their coach, Mrs. MacLeod, the Wrenthain Varsity girls 
marched through their nine-game season with a record of three victories, five losses, and one 
tie. The Junior Varsity team, managed six victories and three losses. 

High scorers on the Varsity team were Delight Harmon, with 110 points, and Judy 
Dumont, a close second with 109 points. On the Junior Varsity Joan Richards made 58 
points and Judy Harper made 43. 

On March 2. a Basketball Play Day was held in Franklin, with girls from Sharon, 
Franklin, North Attleboro, Miliis, Medway. Dover Medfield, and Wrentham participating in 
an afternoon of competition. Seventy-two girls from the various towns were divided into 
two teams, the Reds and the Yellows, each of which selected three basketball squads. Three 
games were played and two out of three were won by the Yellows. 

This Play Day evolved out of meetings of the coaches from these towns who felt the 
need of co-operation and similar policies, and who also by a Referee Pool, officiated at one 
another's games, which fulfilled the common needs of all these schools. 

Although it is not the desire to form a league, the success of unified thinking and action 
is an asset to all schools and Wrentham is proud to be a part. 

First row: Janet Hall. Maureen Paksarian, Brook Bullock, Sandra Jenkins, Janet Farrar, 
Judy Harper, Jessie Williams, Patricia Gross. Second row: Sarah Stabenfeldt and Gail 
Mather, Managers, Joanne Lukow, Marijane Roche, Phyllis Manchester. Judy Dumont, Shirley 
Giannetti, Delight Harmon. Sally Weber, Karen Fahlgren, Gloria Woodhams, Gail Waterman, 
Joan Richards, Patricia Quinn, Gail Gardner, Elin Youngdahl. Mrs. MacLeod. Coach. 




Sponsored by MR. and MRS. J. W. WEBER 

« 25 » 




First row: Helen Larsen, Patricia Quinn, Marijane Roche, Captain. Lynne Ross. Rosemarie 
Coutu. Second ran: Phyllis Manchester, Gloria Woodhams, Miss Murphy, Coach. Delight 
Harmon. Jacqueline Ware. (Absent: Ann Fiumara). 



This fall the high school students, (acuity, and the cheerleaders voted for 
Phyllis Manchester, Rosemarie Coutu. and Helen Larsen to complete the cheer- 
leaders' group. 

The YVrentham cheerleaders were hostess and also gave an exhibition at 
the Third Annual Southeastern Massachusetts Cheerleaders' Tournament on 
January 26. 1955. at the King Philip Auditorium. The first prize winners were 
West Bridgewater in Division I and Walpole in Division II. 

The girls did an excellent job of cheering at all the basketball games this 
season. 

On Frida\ evening, March 28, 1955. the Wreutham Cheerleaders competed 
at Spencer. Massachusetts, and won first prize. About fifty Wrentham sup- 
porters were present to see their well-deserved victory. 



^Jli c L^li eerie a etc 



erd 



Sponsored by BAY STATE POULTRY FARM 



« 26 » 



^jrucuitu ^.Ji 



V 



'earn 



The floor was sticky; the men were dry; and the crowd was getting noisier 
as the game between Wrentham's faculty and Foxboro's faculty progressed. 
Out on the floor were such stars as Mr. "Hooker" Sullivan. Mr. "Swifty" Aucoin, 
Mr. "Dribbler" Delaney, Mr. "Lusty" Lodi and Mr. "All-over" Morgan. To add 
to this list of old players we had such newcomers as Mr. Silva and Mr. Gleek- 
man, both of whom proved to be capable ball-handlers. The game went on with 
each of the players doing his part to make this a victory for Wrentham. They set 
up some very nice plays working Mr. Gleekmans rebounding with Mr. Delaney 's 
dribbling which led to Mr. Aucoin's passes to Mr. Morgan, who drove hard and 
then passed off to Mr. Silva to clinch the basket with a lay-up. This seemed to 
be a pattern to the boys who had only had a few practices before playing the 
games. Every now and then to add some color to the game Mr. Sullivan would 
put in what he terms "a turn-around jump with complications." All in all the 
boys were successful in both their games with Foxboro and managed to raise 
funds to send some senior to college. We congratulate them and wish them luck 
next season. 



Front row: Mr. Edward Morgan, Mr. Albert Aucoin, Mr. Earle Swett, Mr. Frederick, Delaney, 
Mr. Francis Gallipean, Mr. Edwin Carr. Back row: Mr. Ruston Lodi, Mr. Elmer Silva, Mr. 
Frederick Sullivan, Mr. Wallace Gleekman, Mr. Raonl Harpin. 




Sponsored by EARLE'S SERVICE STATION, INC. 
New and Used Cars and Trucks Telephone EV. 4-3221 

« 27 » 




First row: James McAfee. William Burke, Carmen Fiumara, Anthony Macaione, Philip Wood. 
James Robson, Peter Martin, William Birtney, Roland Ferland, Edwin Larsen. Second row: 
Anna Fiumara, Helen Larsen, Lorraine Haire, Kathleen McMahon, Rosemarie Coutu, Elin 
Youngdahl, Lynne Ross, Patricia Gross, Patricia Quinn, Gloria Woodhams, Mareia Salemme, 
Maureen Paksarian, Jesse Williams, Emily Meservie. Marie McMahon, Diana Dery. Third 
row: Sandra Jenkins. Martha Bennett, Phyllis Manchester, Ellen Sprague, Janet Hall, Janet 
Farrar, Joan Richards, Gail Mather, Frances Sherman. Jean O'Dea, Elberta Reed. Violet 
Marehand, Christine Fitzgerald, Beverly Manchester, Betty Sprague, Joanne Slater, Gail 
Gardner, Judy Harper, Dianne DaVia, Loretta Ross, Elizabeth Cox, Sarah Stabenfeldt, Delight 
Harmon, Shirley Giannetti, Mr. Sullivan. Fourth row: Carol Harmon, Gail Waterman, Sue 
Smith, Jackie Ware, Shirley Prue, Sandra Cooper, Lois Watson, Karen Fahlgren, Sally Weber, 
Anita Clark, Erdean Parmenter, Anita Dexter, Andrew Graham, Richard Mitchell, David Cox. 
Walter Pierce, Carl Schwalbe, Peter Morse, Vernon Nelson, Paul Martin, Parker Willard. 

OFFICERS 

President PATRICIA GROSS 

Treasurer PATRICIA QUINN 

Accompanists — 

MARCIA SALEMME, ELIN YOUNGDAHL 

Music Librarian ANDREW GRAHAM 

Publicity Managers — 

LYNNE ROSS, GLORIA WOODHAMS 

The Choral Art Society sponsored their Third Annual Christmas Concert on 
December 17, 1954, under the direction of Mr. Sullivan. The Society is now 
planning to present a spring concert. 

The Society is one of the largest choral groups in this area. Wrentham 
should be proud of their high school music program. 

The Choral Art Society wishes to thank Mr. Sullivan, Mrs. Hugh Marshall, 
and all the others who have helped to make their concert a success. 



^Jhe Littoral -Arrt ^ociel 



Sponsored by HUGH and ELAINE MARSHALL 



« 28 



School (Z5aiicl 



The School Band under the direction of Mr. Sullivan has increased in size 
this year. At present there are fifty members who play regularly with the 
organization. 

We are sure the town is proud of the school band that plays at the 
Memorial Day Parade, Field Day, and concerts. 

OFFICERS 

President JANET GOODWIN 

Concert Master PETER MORSE 

Band Leader MICHAEL RISHTON 

Librarian ANDREW GRAHAM 



First roic: M. Johnson, R. Coutu. Second row: P. Mart-hand. M. Kennedy, P. DaVia, F. 
Hamilton, J. Henderson, J. Fahlgren, R. Chariot, F. Nickerson, D. Wagstaff, R. True. W. 
Massie, S. Morse, R. Nelson. Third row. J. Trepanier, C. Stabenfeldt, J. Irving, J. MeGill, 
J. Floyd, R. Prue, A. Dexter. P. Morse, J. O'Dea, D. Metealf, V. Khoury, D. Mulcahey, C. 
Meegan, K. Hanim, J. Mitchell. Fourth row: N. Giovanella, E. Sprague, M. Rishton, A. 
Maeaione. R. Cobb, G. Bodnier. A. Graham, J. Goodwin, R. Manning, C. Delaney, P. Martin, 
Mr. Sullivan. Members of band not in the picture: G. Towle, C. Harmon, P. Roderick. 







Sponsored by THE CHORAL ART SOCIETY 



« 29 » 




First row, left to right: Joanne Slater, Lynne Ross, Joanne Lukow, Loretta Ross, Patricia 
Gross, David Cox, Delight Harmon, Johanna Macaione, Elin Yonngdahl, Emily Meservie, 
Gail Gardner. Shirley Prue. Second row: Judith Gilmer, Gloria YVoodhams, Sarah Staben- 
feldt, Mary Ann Duffy. Gail Waterman, Jacqueline Ware. Mary Sue Smith. Joan Whyte, 
Betty Sprague, Patricia Quinn, Carol Harmon, Elizabeth Cox, Elberta Reed. Phyllis Man- 
chester, Marcia Salemme, Mrs. Capron. Third row: Patricia Piper. Imre de Jony, James 
Burns, Richard Mitchell, Andrew Graham, Peter Martin, Lee Thompson, Carmen Fiumara. 
Anita Clark, Erdean Parmenter. 

This year The Totler, Wrentham High's own bi-monthly issue, under the 
very able supervision of Mrs. Capron, has become a member of the Student 
Press Association. Increased school spirit has resulted and the volunteer staT 
has gained the opportunity to express their "journalistic" talents. 

Editor-in-Chief: Delight Harmon 

Student Press Representative: David Cox 

Assistant Editors: Johanna Macaione, Janet Goodwin, Jacqueline Ware, Loretta Ross. 

Patricia Gross. Judith Gilmer, Andrew Graham, Mary Ann Duffy, Gail Waterman. 

Carmen Fiumara, Sandra Jenkins, Peter Martin. 
Business Editors: Carol Harmon, Mary Sue Smith, Shirley Pine, Joanne Lukow, Elberta 

Reed. Richard Mitchell, Emily Meservie. 
Humor Editors: Joan Whyte, Anita Clark, Gail Gardner, Allan Wyllie, Elin Yonngdahl, 

Anna Fiumara, James Burns. 

REPORTERS 
Sports: Lynne Ross, Gloria Woodhams Faculty: Joanne Slater, Patricia Piper 

Junior High: Rita Smith, Lee Thompson Grade 11: Betty Sprague 

Grade 12: Patricia Quinn Grade 10: Imre de Jony 

Music: Phyllis Manchester Grade 9: Anita Dexter 



I {ewSpciper S^tall 

Sponsored by THE WRENTHAM FIRE DEPARTMENT 

« 30 » 



f-^ ub lie S^pealuna L^ontedl 



The Third Annual Prize Speaking Contest took place on March 4, 1955 at 
the Vogel School. The contest was sponsored by the Holly Club of Wrentham. 

Mrs. Warren Gilmore, president of the Holly Club, introduced the first 
speaker after the assembly sang one stanza of America. The program continued 
with selections from eleven students. At opportune intervals between each 
speaker's talk, the two school choirs rendered selections. 

The climax of the evening was awarding the prizes to the three winners. 
who were as follows: 

William Binney 1st prize 

Johanna Macaione 2nd prize 

Elizabeth Cox 3rd prize 



Back row. Mrs. Capron. William Binney, David Cox, Judith Gilmer, Anita Clark, Philip 
Wood. Anthony Macaione. Front row: Sarah Stahcnfcldt. Elizabeth Cox. Marcia Salemme, 
Brooke Bullock, Shirley Prue, Johanna Macaione. 




« 31 » 




First row: Janet Farrar, David Cox, Carol Harmon, Marijane Roche, Philip Wood, Mary Sue 
Smith. Second row: Mrs. Viall, Jacqueline Ware, George Willard, Vernon Nelson, Paul 
Schwalbe, Janet Hall, Delight Harmon. 

President PHILIP WOOD 

Vice-President DAVID COX 

Secretary MARIJANE ROCHE 

Treasurer CAROL HARMON 

Freshman Class Representatives 

JANET HALL, PAUL SCHWALBE 

Sophomore Class-Representatives 

JANET FARRAR, VERNON NELSON 

Junior Class Representatives 

DELIGHT HARMON, GEORGE WILLARD 

Senior Class Representatives 

JACQUELINE WARE, MARY SUE SMITH 

This year the Student Council has had no main projects, however, it has 
served the classes as a liaison organization between the faculty and the student 
body. One of the main causes of concern to the Student Council has been the 
deleted condition of our treasury which prevented our sending representatives to 
conventions. But by sponsoring several activities, such as dances and food 
sales we hope to remedy this situation and become an even more effective 
organization. 

*3 la den i (^oun ell 



« 32 » 



L^cLdting ^Jc 



earn 



The Casting Team is a member of the Massachusetts Casting League and is 
sponsored by the Wrentham Sportsman's Association. It is the only high school 
easting team in Massachusetts. League matches are held every Monday night 
in the town hall with seven teams competing. The high school usually comes 
in fourth or fifth place. 

Several members of the team went to the Sportsman's Show in Boston to 
compete. In the finals Elin Youngdahl took first place in the Girls' Division and 
Maureen Paksarian ci.me in second. Bobby Rowell took third place in the 
Novice Division. George Willard came in fifth in the Boys' Division. 



Back WW: Roger Cobb, George Willard, Robert Pnie, David Biney. Front WW: Robert 
Rowell. Betty Ann Lukow, Elin Youngdahl. William Binney, Captain, Maureen Paksarian. 
Inire de Jony. 




Sponsored by WRENTHAM STEEL PRODUCTS 



« 33 » 




Front WW: Carolyn Macaione, Manager, Miss Murphy, Coach, Phyllis Viall, Assistant 
Manager. Back row: Joan Gardner, Ann Kennedy, Ann Marie Hestness, Joan Gross, Rose- 
mary Smith, Carol Ann Delaney, Kathleen Hamm, Patricia Bevilaqua, Joyce Mitchell, Nancy 
Binney, Eileen Waterman, Elaine Willard. 



The junior high cheerleaders consisted of two teams: the eighth grade 
group and the seventh grade group. The eighth graders cheered at all the 
junior high school team games, away and at home. Their uniforms consisted of 
maroon corduroy short skirts, yellow sweaters, yellow tights, yellow socks, and 
white sneakers. The eighth grade girls had maroon corduroy beanies with a 
yellow pom-pom. Included in this group were Joan Gross, Carol Ann Delaney, 
Kathleen Hamm, Patricia Bevilaqua, Joyce Mitchell, and Rosemary Smith. 

The seventh grade cheerleaders participated in all high school girls' basket- 
ball games at home. These girls were Joan Gardner. Ann Kennedy, Ann Marie 
Hestness. Nancv Binnev. Eileen Waterman, and Elaine Willard. 

With the able leadership of Miss Murphy, Mr. Morgan, and the two 
managers, Phyllis Viall and Carolyn Macaione. both teams enjoyed a very suc- 
cessful season. 



Aunlor ^rriait S^ckoot L^heerleacierd 



« 34 » 



J- 



iinior 



^hriah (/^adhetball S^ciuaci 



The Junior High School basketball team had another successful season 
under the direction of Mr. Edward J. Morgan. Although the boys lost by close 
decisions to Norton and Mansfield, they did defeat their neighborhood rivals, 
Plainville and Norfolk. Many of the boys from the seventh and eighth grades 
participated in all of the games played. The high scorers on the first team were 
John Aikens and Gerald Bodmer. 

Members of the junior varsity squad: David Aikens, Ronald Blanchard, 
James Card, Raymond Ferland, Frank Hainey, William Hones, David L. Herault, 
John MacGill, Robert Peckham, Peter Roderick, Hugh Ronney, David Ross, 
William Sumner, and George Towle. 



From left to right, standing: James Miner, James Cheever, Wayne Nightingale, Robert Hobbs, 
Gerald Bodmer, George Beard, Ronald Ferland, Robert Bettenconrt, Joseph Cheven, Robert 
Stahl, Richard Nelson, Richard Brothers, Charles Campbell, David Searle, Coach Edward 
Morgan. Seated: Richard True, Manager, Charles Burt, Frank Hamilton, Assistant Man- 
ager. Two members. John Aikens and Stephen Field, were absent when the picture 
was taken. 




«35 




First WW: .1. Woolford, L. Manchester. J. Lambert. J. Gross. J. Harper. K. Ferland, R. 
Anderson, P. Paquette, A. Hogarth, J. Jones, K. Metcalf. M. Johnson. S. Damato. X. Gian- 
netti. Second rote: B. Ellsworth, L. Grant, W. Palmer, E. Waterman, A. Hoar. K. Wass, 
J. Lindsay. L. Poland. M. Mongeon. R. Smith, J. Trepanier. D. Metcalf, C. Weber, D. Pfeiffer. 
P. Lengel, C. Delaney, J. Mitchell, L. Maclnnis, C. LeBoenf, D. Jones. Mr. Sullivan, director. 
Third row: C. Barrows. K. Hamm. P. Viall, D. Pierce. J. Chapin, E. Willard. X. Giovanella. 
S. Harris, P. Dexter, V. Khoury, B. Moriarty. P. Bevilaqna. V. Palmer. A. Kennedy, X. Mullen, 
S. Mitchell, G. LaDue, A. Apsit. V. Metcalf. J. Floyd. Also in the choir but not in picture: 
X. Binney. K. Coylc. G. Deschamps, A. Hestncss. J. Olson, L. Thompson, B. Willard. 



The Junior High School Descant Choir participated in United Nations 
Concert, at the Christmas Concert, and at the Prize Speaking Concert. 



J* 



nmor 



^hrlcih S^chool ^DcScant i^fi 



Oil' 



« 36 » 



ZJhe United I lationd Jsn lA/renlhatn 

Philip Wood 

There is a small town located in southeastern Massachusetts which would appear to 
travelers to he typically New England; the giant shade trees bordering its streets, the old 
stately homes mingled with newly constructed dwellings peeking from beyond the trees, the 
town common with its benches, greenery, and statue in memoriam of a Civil War hero, and 
the antiquated architecture of the Protestant Church topped by its legendary towering 
steeple. And the four thousand people of the town differ in no way, save physical appear- 
ance, from the folks in your neighborhood: the man of the family off for work in the morning, 
the children converging on the local institutions of learning, the mothers taking "baby" for a 
walk along leaf-buried sidewalks, and after school the younger children crashing through 
hedges in an imitation of Roy Rogers, while the older students plod homeward heavy laden 
with books. Yes, this could be almost any quiet New England village. However, it is Wren- 
tham, which recently observed United Nations Day by devoting one whole week-end to this 
observance for the financial benefit of the United Nations and the cultural benefit of the 
townspeople. 

The idea was conceived several months prior to the actual celebration, but this time was 
needed for the basic planning necessary for the undertaking of such a project. 

Every pupil in school from the first grade on up to the twelfth grade participated in one 
manner or another lending their contributions to the successful climax on November 5. The 
grammar school and junior high were entrusted with the learning of the dances and folk 
songs and endless rehearsals began for them soon after school opened. The high school 
participated in many ways. A prize was offered, a trip to New York City, to four pupils, one 
from each grade in the high school for the winning essays written on the United Nations, and 
each student was required to write one. But these literary works were not uninspired, for 
every available bulletin board displayed posters concerning the U. N., special assemblies, 
were called for the purpose of viewing films explaining the aims and purposes of the U. N., 
and a guest speaker. Mrs. Dorothy Lewis, provided an enjoyable and informative talk on the 
organization and duties of the United Nations. The United States History class composed 
thirty page notebooks delving into the organization. The Home Economics class, not to be 
outdone, made up a menu for school lunches which featured meals from other nations, and 
the art class prepared menus for a tea. 

Then slowly as the weeks progressed donations of space for a fair were received from 
the Congregational Church. Goods imported from the different countries were procured for 
the sale; members of the Congregational Church offered their time and services, and finally the 
day for the opening of the observance drew forth. 

On Friday morning, November fifth, and throughout the day, classes from the junior and 
senior high schools toured the Congregational Church, where booths had been set up. Each 
booth was devoted to a geographical section of the world or a country and had on display 
wares representative of the country or section. As the students visited a booth they re- 
ceived a thumb-nail sketch of the countries included, the people, the geography, products, 
and economy. Then Friday evening the grammar school performed their long-rehearsed 
songs and dances and the winning essays were read before an audience of about four hundred 
and fifty people. Saturday morning the booths opened for business and the different wares 
displayed the previous day were offered to the public: brass work from the Far East, 
tapestries from the Middle East, carvings from Africa, Hummel figures, and toys from 
Europe, and pottery and weavings typical of Central America. An International supper was 
presented that evening featuring tables which specialized in Scandinavian, Chinese, and 
American food with several foreign exchange students attending. Sunday, November seventh, 
the Congregational Church had a guest minister, the Reverend Khanti Bhogat from India, 
and as the culminating activity, a tea was organized by a Citizen's Committee for the after- 
noon with a guest speaker from the United Nations and the visiting students from other 
countries in attendance as guests in the school auditorium. 

Thus you see why this town of Wrentham, in my eyes, is due great credit for the 
cooperation which went into this memorable observance, to say nothing of the labor and time. 
Perhaps more villages and towns thoughout America should endeavor to attempt a similar 
observance to teach their people the value of toleration, cooperation, and the essential inner 
mechanisms of the United Nations as a conductor of peace and good will so their people 
may become intelligent world citizens and protect those picturesque towns from being 
destroyed. 

Yes, Wrentham, to the passer through, may seem a quiet, dull town, but believe me it is 
an inspiringly wonderful town in which to live. 



« 37 » 



i lealected 

Carmen Fiumara 

You're unwanted, so you say; 

You're always feeling blue. 

The telephone may ring all day 

But never rings for you. 

All you do is sit at home, 

While all your friends go out; 

And at a dance you're all alone, 

You just sit and pout. 

You never want to play the games. 

The other fellows play, 

Girls laugh at you and call you names, 

Then they run away. 

What good reason can be found? 

Is everybody scheming? 

No, the world is going round. 

While you, my friend, arc dreaming! 



I light cJLif-e 

Andrew Graham 

The moon is a globe of crystal 

Cutting the onyx night. 

Its beams are binding the ocean 

With bands of golden light. 

The stars are the children of heaven 

At play in the midnight sky. 

In the shadows are ccol. dark places 

Where the night winds whisper and sigh. 

The trees that stand by the wayside 

Are giants, tall and slack; 

The road that twists on like a ribbon 

Forms a winding track. 

Rut when the moon is hidden 

Behind the cloud's dark wall. 

The earth is dull and dreary 

And the magic is gone from all. 



« ?.Q » 



^Tiumni 



L^iaM of 1951 

Florence Bennett is married. 

Gabriella Bernardini is married. 

Bernie Blodgett is in the United States Navy. 

Edgar Brown is in the United States Navy. 

Harvey Bowers is in the United States Air Force. 

Thomas Donaldson is attending Norwich University. 

James Driggers is in the United States Navy. 

Albert Fuller is in the United States Army. 

Doris Griffen is employed at the Foxboro Company. 

Claire Grover is attending Massachusetts School of Art. 

David Jones is in the United States Marine Corps. 

Judith Kady is married. 

Peggy Landry is in the United States Women's Marine Corps. 

Henrv Lewis is attending Boston University. 

Dorothy Meservie is married. 

Larz Olson is employed. 

Nancy Regan is married. 

Jeanne Riley is married. 

John Riseman is attending college. 

Joanne Silver 

Harold Wood is in the United States Marine Corps. 



C/aJJ of 1952 



Carole Binney is attending Colby Junior College. 

Edith Burns is attending Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. 

Donald Gendron is in the United States Air Force. 

Isabel Giannetti is employed at Crosby-Ashton. 

Richard Giannetti is in baseball training. 

June Gross is attending Boston University. 

Richard Haehnal is employed. 

Ada Hobby is married. 

Carol Hogarth is employed at Crosby-Ashton. 

James Jordon is employed. 

Virginia Knapp is employed at the Foxboro Company. 

Jean Manchester is married. 

Hugh Marshall is attending the University of Maine. 

Lorraine Meegan is employed. 

Patricia Roche is employed at the Wrentham State School. 

Virginia Schwalbe is employed. 

David Waterman is in the United States Air Force. 

Lawrence Wheeler is in the United States Air Force. 

John Wignall is in the United States Navy. 



« 39 » 



C/aJd of 1953 



Dorothea Comendul is attending Henry O. Peabody School. 

Frances Dware is married. 

Patricia Farrell is attending Fisher Junior College. 

V. Jane Fermano is employed at Crosby-Ashton. 

Natalie Follis is married. 

Barbara Fuller is married. 

Audrey Fyeberg is employed at the Wrentham State School. 

Alfred Hooper is employed. 

Marvis Hoyt is married. 

Barbara Knlik is employed. 

Dorothy Larsen is employed at the Walpole Telephone Exchange. 

Carol Lanshway is married. 

Harriet Le Blanc is married. 

Evelyn Meegan is in training at Pondville Hospital. 

Janet Parker is married. 

Robert Rognski is attending Stonehill College. 

Ruth Sprague is employed at the Foxboro Company. 

Ruth Webber is married. 



CL*& of 1954 



Joan Driggers is attending Massachusetts School of Art. 

Marsha Goode is attending Mount Ida. 

Beverley Harper is attending Mount Ida. 

Ely Intlehouse is employed. 

Diana Jenkins is married. 

Joyce Klienberg is attending the Henry O. Peabody School. 

Gail LaDue is attending the University of Massachusetts. 

Kathleen Laushway is employed. 

Dorothy Lewis is attending the University of Massachusetts. 

David Libbey is in the United States Navy. 

Judith LittleSeld is attending Lasell Junior College. 

William Lynch is in the United States Navy. 

Enid Marshall is attending a business school in Boston. 

Martha Metcalf is employed. 

Kenneth Olson is in the United States Navy. 

Harold Paine is in the United States Navy. 

Mary Jean Richards is attending {Catherine Gibbs School. 

Gilbert Rishton is attending the University of Massachusetts. 

Patricia Robson is in training at Sturdy Memorial Hospital. 

Phillip Scott is attending Northeastern University. 

Ronald Shepherd is attending Boston University. 

Mary Sprague is employed at Crosby-Ashton. 

Judith Turner is in training at the Sturdy Memorial Hospital. 

Jean Watson is married. 

Robert Whyte is in the United States Navy. 



« 40 » 



WHITING 



AND 



DAVIS 



PURDY 



rt 



PHOTOGRAPHERS AND LIMNERS 



* 



367 BOYLSTON STREET 



BOSTON 



KING PHILIP 



LAKE PEARL PARK 



WRENTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



CROSBY STEAM GAGE AND 
VALVE COMPANY 



THE ASHTON VALVE COMPANY 



SAFETY A\D RELIEF VALVES 



PRESSURE GAGES 



WRENTHAM - BOSTON - NEW YORK 

CHICAGO - DALLAS - LOS ANGELES 

LONDON - PARIS 



THE 






COFFEE SHOP and RESTAURANT 



U. S. ROUTE 1 (Boston-Providence Highway) 



WRENTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



□ 



QUALITY FOODS EXPERTY PREPARED 



1 ABU LOIS BAKE SHOP 



OPEN 24 HOURS 



□ 



Your Hosts 



Steve Spaneas and Ed Hannigan 



HEALTH. WEALTH. AND HAPPINESS 
TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE 1955 GRADUATING GLASS 



Compliments of 



NORFOLK COUNTY HOMES 

BOSTON - PROVIDENCE TURNPIKE 

JUNCTION ROUTES 1 and 27 

WALPOLE, MASS. TEL. WALPOLE 1770-1771 



Bl ILDERS OF FINER TYPE HOMES AT MODERATE PRICES 



BEST TERMS AVAILABLE - G.I., NON-VET FINANCING 



NOTE: To the first member of the 1955 graduating class who marries 
and purchases a new home at our Wrentham Development we will pay 
all closing costs and also furnish at no cost to purchaser insurance for five 
years. Purchase price will be at our established selling advertised prices 
as set forth on Certificate of Reasonable Value by the Veterans 
Administration. 



Courtesy of The 



EAST SIDE ATHLETIC CLUB 



CARL WHIPPLE'S DAIRIES 

Wrentham Telephone Canal 597-J-4 Massachusetts 

MILK - CREAM 



Deliveries in 

WRENTHAM - NORTH ATTLEBORO - WOONSOCKET 

PLAINVILLE - BELLINGHAM - BLACKSTONE 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

Attleboro Massachusetts 



'Known Wherever There Are Schools and Colleges" 



CLASS RINGS AND PINS 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS - DIPLOMAS - PERSONAL CARDS 

CLUR INSIGNIA - MEDALS AND TROPHIES 



MR. TOM GALVIN — Representative 



UNITED SHEET METAL CO. 

HEATING. VENTILATING, AND AIR CONDITIONING 

Authorized Dealers for 

PERFECTION - WATERRURY AND SUNREAM FURNACES 

GAS OR OIL RURNERS 

All Installations Guaranteed 
Free Estimates General Sheet Metal Work 

Local Representatives 

JAMES W. MERRITT 525 West Street 

GEORGE N. KHOURY 545 West Street 

The Student Graduating This Year With the Highest Marks 
Will Receive a $25 Savings Rond 



LYNCH ELECTRIC 



RAYMOND AND FARRAR 



WRENTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Telephone EVergreen 4-3134 and 4-2610 



BRUNELU'S SUPERMARKET 



WHERE OUR CUSTOMERS SEND THEIR FRIENDS 



ROUTE 140 FRANKLIN, MASS. 



OPEN NIGHTLY UNTIL 9 P. M. 



OUR PEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1955 



WRENTHAAA INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

(CARL F. POND) 



LILLA M. POND 



INSURANCE OF ALE KINDS 



MORSE BUILDING NEXT TO POST OFFICE 



Telephone EVergreen 4-2542 



WRENTHAAA IMPLEMENT CO. 



ROUTE 140 WRENTHAM, MASS. 



Telephone EVergreen 4-3322 



DAVIS STORE 



HILLTOP TRAILER COURT 



FOXBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR BETTER LIVING 



You Can't Make a Mistake on Any 
Purchase You Make at-A&P! 



This is more than a promise — it's a guarantee that you'll never risk 
a penny on any item you buy at A&P. At A&P the sale is never completed 
until your completely satisfied. The sale must measure up to your every 
expectation — or, A&P will promptly refund your money — no questions 
asked. 



You can't make a mistake on any purchase you make at — 



A&P SUPER MARKETS 



The Holiday Motel 



Carl G. Carlson 

WRENTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Earl W. Peck 



Cond)ination Aluminum Doors and Windows 



Jalousies - Awnings 



Green Acres Turkey Farm 

Farm Fresh Turkeys - Roasters - Broilers 



£gg* 



Free Delivery 

566 West Street Tel. Evergreen 4-2441 Wrentham, Mass. 



W. J. Ross Co. 

13'/2 North Washington Street North Attleboro, Mass. 

Complete Outfits for Children Up to Teenage 



WillarcTs Custom Slaughtering 

212 Winter Street Wrentham, Mass. 

L. B. Willard, Proprietor 

Old Fashioned Hickory Smoked and Sugar Cured 
Hams, Shoulders, and Bacon 

Telephone EVergreen 4-2412 

Natural Gem and Mineral Company, Inc. 

13 Morley Street Tel. Attleboro 3-2304 Attleboro, Mass. 

H. Irving Stringer President Mildred Leonard Secretary 

Curtis W. Leonard Vice-President Evelyn Moller Treasurer 

Hand Made Jewelry a Specialty - Repairing and Modernizing of Old Jewelry 
Precious and Semi-Precious Stones, Minerals, and Natural Gems in Rough 

Hobby Supplies for Cutting and Polishing of Gem Stones 



Sterling Sales, Inc. 

787 Main Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Arthur B. Martin President H. Irving Stringer Treasurer 

Thomas J. Fay Vice-President Joseph W. Sylvia Secretary 



Jones' Beach 



LAKE ARCHER 



Bathing - Boating - Canoeing 



The Mirror Club 



Dibblee Oil and Ice Co. 



EVergreen 4-2224 



A. John AAacaione 

Painting - Papering 

Wrentham, Massachusetts 



Miller's Market 



Fonta i ne's Resta u ra nt 



Route 1 Wrentham 



Cocktails 



Walpole Launderette 



Al and Florence Nelson 



Walpole Massachusetts 



Carpet Center, Inc. 



960 Main Street Tel. Walpole 432 Walpole, Mass. 



Ross Funeral Home 



Wrentham Massachusetts 



Peckham's at Wampum Corner 



Everything From Son)) to Nuts 



Open Sundays 



Charles E. Sanford 

Excavating 

Cellars - Trenches - Cesspools 

791 South Street Tel. EVergreen 4-2501 Wrentham, Mass. 

Reliable News Bureau 

and 

Margaret Curtis Real Estate and Insurance 

North Attleboro 



Gas-Diesel Fuel Pumps Bunk-Showers 

Bill and Frank's 

Always Open TRUCK STOP Always Open 

24 Hour Tire Service 

Route 1, Wrentham, Mass. Between Boston and Providence 

Phone: EVergreen 4-3184 



Dr. David Pinsky 

Franklin, Massachusetts 



Bugbee and Niles 



Plainville Massachusetts 



Wrentham Police Department 



Dean Jewelers 

Budget Your Purchases 
Never an Interest Charge 

14 Main Street Tel. Franklin 1085 Franklin, Mass. 



Ficco's Bowladrome 



Snack Bar 



For Reservations Call Franklin 5234 



AA. A. Vigorito 

Tailoring and Toggery 
6 Washington Street North Attleboro, Mass. 



Morse Paint and Supply Company 

Gifts - Pyrexware - Paints - Hardware 
Wrentham, Massachusetts 



The Corner Shop 



Al Watson 



Sheldonville 



Miller's Department Store 



North Attleboro 



Fred C. Browne, Inc. 

1426 Main Street 
Walpole, Massachusetts 



Bertha 

Hairdresser 



East Street Garage 

"Round the Car Service" - General Repairing 

R. A. Giannetti, Proprietor 

Telephone EVergreen 4-3362 Wrentham, Mass. 



Wrentham Dairy 

Telephone EVergreen 4-3444 



Dr. Roderick 



Kentuck Farm 

Apples and Cider 
Route 1 1 West Wrentham 

W. Massif 



Dr. Raymond 



AA. Parker Willard 



Auto Dealer 



Wrentham I. G. A. 



Meats, Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 



Telephone EVergreen 4-3103 Wrentham, Massachusetts 



Glenna B. Sanford 

Greeting Cards, Lorraine Plastics, Gifts, and Stationery 



791 South Street 



Wrentham, Mass. 



Telephone EVergreen 4-2501 



Telephone EVergreen 4-2251 



G. Milton Avery 

Attorney and Counselor at Law 



209 South Street 



Wrentham, Mass. 



Shear Street 



Kirstein's Market 



Wrentham, Mass. 



Meats, Groceries. Frozen Foods, Baby Foods 
Turkeys, Ducks, Rabbits 



Telephone EVergreen 4-2262 



Burns 7 Poultry Farm 

Oven Ready Turkeys, Chickens; Foul 
Strictly Fresh Eggs 



Park Street 



Tel. EVergreen 4-3173 



Wrentham 



Congratulations and Good Luck to the Class of 1955 

James I. Forsyth 

Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law 

Wrentham, Massachusetts 



Bernardini's Insurance Agency 

Insurance and Real Estate 

52 South Street Wrentham, Mass. 

Tel.: EVergreen 4-3141 - Residence EVergreen 4-3230 

BRANDY'S SHOE STORE 

"Nationally Advertised Footwear" 
944A Main Street Walpole, Massachusetts 

ENNA JETTICK - SANDLER - BOSTONIAN 

JARMAN - BATES - FLEET-AIR 

X-Ray Fitting 

W. K. GILMORE & SONS, INC. 

Wrentham, Massachusetts 

Wirthmore Feeds - Reacon Feeds- 
Coal and Mason Materials - Fuel Oil 



Walter H. Stewart 

Insurance 

577 South Street Wrentham, Mass. 

Telephone EVergreen 4-2461 



Giannetti Bros. Express 

Wrentham, Massachusetts 
Tel. EVergreen 4-2500 



L & B Motors, Inc. 

Telephone EVergreen 4-2511 
Ohisniobile Dealers - G. M. C. Trucks 



Central Motor Sales, Inc. 

Your Chevrolet Dealer 
Telephone EVergreen 4-2500 



BOOSTERS 



THE WRENTHAAA PHARMACY 

WRENTHAAA RADIO-TV SERVICE 

HENRY'S BARBER SHOP 

THE PINI TOWNE HOUSE 

G. H. SCOTT 

FOXCROFT GARDENS 

CLYDE W. WATERMAN 

MARY'S GIFTS North Attleboro 

SHANER SHOES North Attleboro 

CARNEGIE North Attleboro 

CARROLL'S COSMETICS North Attleboro 

DR. LECO North Attleboro 

ANN MARIE'S North Attleboro 

ENDICOTT JOHNSON North Attleboro 

J. J. NEWBURY North Attleboro 

DR. CALVIN WILKINS, Optometrist North Attleboro 

AL'S SERVICE STATION Plainville Center 

GRAND MOTEL Route 1, Foxboro 

WRENTHAM AUTO SALES Route 1, Wrentham 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER E. DUFFY 

EDWARD J. MORRELL 

RON'S MEN'S SHOP Franklin 

ORENT BROTHERS North Attleboro 

KING'S BARBER SHOP 

DR. WARDNER 

DR. BROOKS 

THE SOUTH STREET DINER 



THE WAMPUM PRESS 




WEDDING INVITATIONS 
Raised Printed or Engraved 



15 Kendrick Street 



Wrentham, Mass. 



Tel. EVergreen 4-2269 




FOPD5 

CHARlFS R f'ETER c - 

1 ■"'''' IB i '''-' ■ : r 
i'Umm ,.. RESTAURANT 

BERNARD M. JMARTlH 
f.f i it Q PHARMACY 

iVANO^'m,.' )• I -1 .V| .'''I.J k'i ! ,' 

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NORMAN R. TOWIE 
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jA; i pN -', PACKAGE STORE 
GAUO'S GRCfNHOUSe 
BONO SMOE& 
DOM'S 0)ffh -. h< •" 
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( LtVtt ; ,• - J L_> OIL .,'' '»V N\ 

C.S. hoi' COMPANY 

HERBERT W. iEWIS ■• •■ - ? •'•'"- AGENCY 

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